Mosaicultures International of Montreal
at Hamamatsu 2009 in Japan

September 19 to November 23, 2009
Hamamatsu Flower Park, Japan

MONTREAL EXHIBIT
THE MAN WHO PLANTED TREES

The 1987 film The Man Who Planted Trees, by Montréal filmmaker Frédéric Back, celebrates the single-handed efforts of one man, Elzéard Bouffier, who toils to improve his environment.

Out of a desolate territory, the dedicated efforts of this generous shepherd make bloom a vibrant forest.

The desert is depicted by the rock in which Elzéard Bouffier plants his maple trees, whose canopy grow to form rainbow symbolizing hope and rebirth. The rainbow and the maple do not just lend themselves well to the special effect of mosaiculture, but they are also emblems of Québec, where the forests don flamboyant colours every autumn.

Furthermore, the horses that gallop through the flowering prairie represent liberty and a return to life.

In order to fully appreciate the message of the work, visitors are invited to stroll through the site on a musical score.

L’HOMME QUI PLANTAIT DES ARBRES


The Montreal exhibit occupies a 2,000 m2 site strategically located at the beginning of the route visitors
will take through the exhibition. It is also near the demonstration area. The site has interesting natural features, which have been incorporated into the work.

It thus becomes a veritable mosaiculture garden, with the landscape changing from an arid wasteland into a verdant, treed space, representing life restored thanks to the efforts of the simple shepherd. Through the garden wends a path resembling a musical staff. Visitors moving along the path will be the “living notes” in the composition of this sylvan symphony.

The trees in the Montreal exhibit are maples to represent Quebec nature. Planted in concentric arcs so that the fall foliage creates a rainbow effect, they are a novel element in mosaiculture.

Elzéard Bouffier is shown kneeling down, about to plant a maple shoot. His flowing cape helps blend the five-metre high figure into the undulating topography of the site. To his left and in front of him, the wasteland is represented by rock-covered terrain, where his sheep graze under the watchful eye of his dog. Behind him, restored life is represented by the rainbow of maple trees and horses cantering in a flowery meadow, like those seen in Frédéric Back’s film. All of the animals are twice life size to match the scale of the man planting trees.

This exhibit will be very distinctive thanks to its innovative concept and the artistic treatment of the elements composing it. It will also strike a chord because The Man Who Planted Trees has been translated into Japanese and is well known throughout Japan.

Over 80 cities, from 30 countries, are participating in the fourth Mosaicultures International® exhibition,
being held this year in Hamamatsu, Japan. With 400,000 tickets already sold, this Japanese edition of the event promises to be an unprecedented success. It officially opens on September 18, 2009 under the high patronage of the Imperial family of Japan and runs until November 23, enabling visitors to discover a variety of horticultural artworks from around the world.

 

Photos: MIH2009



Photos: International Mosaiculture of Montreal®

ŒUVRE DE MONTRÉAL

ŒUVRE DE MONTRÉAL

ŒUVRE DE MONTRÉAL

ŒUVRE DE MONTRÉAL






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